Callaway Photo Gallery  
 
 

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

Callaway Energy Center looking to the southeast.

Callaway Energy Center power block. The reactor containment building is 205 feet tall and 150 feet in diameter. It is constructed of reinforced concrete and steel four feet thick.

View high above the energy center’s 553’ tall cooling tower - the second tallest structure in Missouri behind the Gateway Arch. The white plume coming from the top of the structure is clean water vapor, not smoke.

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

Callaway Energy Center looking north.

Callaway Energy Center with the switchyard in the lower right corner.

Callaway Energy Center looking to the southwest.

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

Acreage surrounding Callaway Energy Center. Ameren Missouri owns 7,200 acres around the energy center. Callaway utilizes 900 acres and the remaining 6,300 acres are part of the Reform Conservation Area managed by the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Callaway Energy Center looking to the northeast. The cooling tower cools approximately 585,000 gallons of water per minute when the energy center is operating at full power.

The cooling water intake structure on the Missouri River. The energy center is located five miles north of the Missouri River on a plateau 300 feet above the average river level.

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

Callaway Energy Center switchyard looking due north. Nuclear power plants are among the safest workplaces in the U.S. The white plume coming from the top of the structure is clean water vapor, not smoke.

Callaway Energy Center’s power block. The facility is one of 104 energy centers in the U.S. and 429 energy centers in the world.

345 kV transmission line leaving the energy center. Callaway Energy Center generates enough electricity to supply 780,000 average households every year.

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

345 kilovolt transmission tower. Callaway Energy Center’s generating capacity is 1,190 megawatts (net).

193 fuel assemblies inside the reactor vessel. Raising the control rods enables the nuclear reaction to start. Lowering the control rods shuts the reactor down.

Refueling operation, which occurs every 18 months at Callaway Energy Center. During a refueling, nearly half of the 193 fuel assemblies are replaced with new assemblies.

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

high-resolution image

Refueling operations. Nuclear fuel is remarkably efficient and abundant. One 7-gram uranium fuel pellet provides as much energy as 17,000 cubic feet of natural gas, 149 gallons of oil or one ton of coal.

Refueling operation with the reactor vessel head on a stand. All of the used fuel used at Callaway Energy Center from 25 years of operation fits in a space about the size of a tennis court.

Reactor vessel head on a stand during a refueling outage. Callaway Energy Center takes about 30 days to refuel. The average refueling outage across the U.S. is 40 days.

high-resolution image

A fuel assembly being off-loaded during a refueling outage. Each fuel assembly weighs about 1,140 pounds. The fuel assembly is inside the cylindrical tube shown in this picture. Note the clarity of the water. The Refuel Pool is filled with water and is about 30 feet deep.

callaway photo gallery, callaway photos, callaway images, image, high resolution, pictures, photo, photos
 
 
Follow Us