— G —

Gas vehicle
A natural gas vehicle, or NGV, is an alternative fuel vehicle that uses compressed natural gas (CNG) as a clean alternative to other automobile fuels. (more)

Generator
A motor fueled either by gasoline, natural gas, propane, or diesel fuel, that turns a generator to create electric energy used in the event of an emergency power outage. (more)

Geothermal energy
Geothermal uses the earth's resources, such as ground or air for heating or cooling. With the use of a ground source heat pump, fluid can be circulated into a closed loop system for heating and cooling. (more)

Glass doors, fireplace
Fireplace doors help save energy all year long by keeping cold air from blowing down the chimney, and preventing heated air from going up and out the chimney. (more)

Glass-free polyester insulation
Insulation is added to buildings for comfort and saving energy. Glass-free polyester insulation is made from recycled plastic bottles and other post-consumer materials. (more)

Green Button
Green Button is a new initiative to provide electric customers with easy access to their usage data in a nationwide common data format. The Energy Service Provider Interface (ESPI) helps customers or aggregators download and compare data information from across different utilities. Ameren Missouri has provided customers with usage data since 1998 though we do not currently use the Green Button format. Customers can view and download their household or building energy usage data by logging into their Ameren Missouri online account. Usage information is updated monthly. Business customers, who have the appropriate meter installed, have additional options to access and view their energy usage data. They have the option of downloading data in intervals of 15 minutes, 60 minutes and by day or by month.

Green facades
Living walls (also called green walls, green facades, bio walls or vertical vegetation walls) have vegetation growing directly onto a building or home, or on a separate structure that can be freestanding or attached to a wall. Today living walls are re-entering the spotlight as an environmentally friendly way to reduce energy costs. (more)

Green roof
A green roof is a residential or commercial building with vegetation growing on part or all of the rooftop. Green roofs may also be known as living roofs and are designed to be environmentally and aesthetically pleasing. (more)

Green walls
Living walls (also called green walls, green facades, bio walls or vertical vegetation walls) have vegetation growing directly onto a building or home, or on a separate structure that can be freestanding or attached to a wall. Today living walls are re-entering the spotlight as an environmentally friendly way to reduce energy costs. (more)

Griddle - food service
Griddles are a versatile piece of equipment and a workhorse appliance found on most kitchen lines. Variations in efficiency, production capacity, and temperature uniformity make it important to choose wisely when shopping for a griddle. Many energy-efficient griddles can deliver both high production capacity and excellent temperature uniformity. (more)

Ground-source system (also called geothermal)
Systems using the earth’s constant underground temperature or outside air temperature to heat or cool homes and other buildings. (more)

GU-24 lamps
GU-24 lamps, also called light bulbs, are a relatively new style of light bulb or a fixture/lamp combination. They are manufactured with a two pin base rather than a screw in a traditional “Edison” type base ensuring future lighting systems will only allow the use of energy efficient pins type lamps. (more)
 

— H —

Halogen CFL
A halogen CFL is a combination CFL with a halogen bulb in the center of the CFL coil, allowing instant brightness at 100% full light without the CFL warm-up time. (more)

Halogen light bulb
A halogen bulb is the combination of a tungsten filament surrounded by halogen gas inside the glass bulb. Because of the reaction between the tungsten and halogen, the temperature inside the bulb allows it to operate at a much higher temperature, giving off more lumens than a standard bulb. (more)
 
Heat pump
A heat pump - also called a geothermal heat pump or a ground source heat pump - is a central heating/cooling system that pumps heating or cooling temperatures from the ground to heat or cool your home. (more)

Heat pump, clothes dryer
The hot, humid air from the tumbler is passed through a heat pump where the cold side condenses the water vapor into either a drain pipe or a collection tank and the hot side reheats the air. In this way not only does the dryer avoid the need for ducting, but it also conserves much of its heat within the dryer instead of exhausting it into the surroundings. Heat pump dryers can therefore use less than half the energy required by either condensation or traditional dryers. (more)

Heat pump water heater
A heat pump water heater pulls heat from the surrounding air and empties it into a tank to heat the water. When located in the right location, they can be very efficient. (more)

Heater controls
An electronic control system that is well maintained can help control the comfort level inside a commercial building, as well as save energy. (more)

Heating, electric
Electric baseboard heating converts nearly 100% of the electricity it uses into heat. However, according to the Department of Energy, using electricity as a fuel is often more expensive than heat produced using combustion appliances, such as natural gas, propane and oil furnaces. (more)

Heating - Residential savings tips
According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the average residential home heating costs could be up to 45% of your energy bill. Fireplaces, an old furnace filter, drafty doors and windows are just a few energy users in your home that can play a role in wasting energy and costing you money. For ways to save, see our residential savings tips. (more)

HERS rater
A Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Rater is a qualified individual who has performed and passed the required national rater test. (more)

HERS rating/HERS index
Home Energy Rating System (HERS) involves an analysis of a home's construction plans and onsite inspections. Based on the home's plans, the Home Energy Rater uses an energy efficiency software package to perform an energy analysis of the home's design. (more)

High bay lighting
Business lighting that is installed over 18 feet or higher and could qualify for an Electric Business Incentive. (more)

Holiday lights
Holiday lights come in many bulb sizes and use different amounts of energy. Older lights with larger bulbs use more energy and could also create safety issues. Replacing old lights may be a safer and wiser energy choice for the holiday season. (more)

Home Energy Audit
An energy audit is an energy conservation inspection or survey, combined with an analysis, of the electric and natural gas flows for a home, building, process or system. The audit is conducted to find ways to reduce the amount of energy input into the system without causing a negative effect. Audit recommendations on ways to use less energy may include, but not limited to, caulking, window weather stripping, window insulation, door weather stripping, ceiling or wall insulation, windows, low flow shower heads, faucet aerators, gas water heater wrap, switch and outlet insulation, and hot water system whether electric or gas. The purpose of the audit is to calculate energy savings from making improvements. (more)

Hot water reader
Thermostat dials on water heaters don’t typically have temperature markings on the dial and are often inaccurate. This means that your hot water temperature may be set too high. Not only does this waste energy but it can also be a scalding safety hazard. A water heater reader or thermometer may help. (more)

HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning)
For residential and business customers, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems are critical in maintaining comfort for occupants. (residential  |  business)

Hydroelectric power plants
Power plants that generate electricity when falling water makes a turbine spin.

Hydropower
Electricity that is generated when water flows through a designated path turning a turbine attached to a generator.


— I —

Ice box
A device used to keep food cold. A new refrigerator with an ENERGY STAR® label uses at least 20% less energy than required by current federal standards and 40% less energy than the conventional models sold before 2002. (more)

Imaging equipment
Copy machines print paper copies of documents and other visual images quickly and cheaply. A scanner is a device that optically scans images, printed text, handwriting or an object, converting it to a digital image. Making the right equipment choice can reduce energy costs. (more)

Incandescent bulb
Incandescent lighting has traditionally delivered about 85% of household lighting. Making improvements to your lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. (more)

Incandescent 100 watt bulb 
Energy measures passed by federal legislation in December  2007 encourage the use more energy-efficient lighting.  Although the United States is not immediately eliminating incandescent light bulbs, it has set minimum efficiency standards which may phase out the availability of incandescent bulbs. Incandescent bulbs currently do not meet the minimum standards. These minimum standards phase in between 2012 and 2014. Federal legislation requires all general-purpose light bulbs that produce 310 - 2600 lumens of light to be 30% more energy efficient incandescent bulbs by 2012 to 2014. The efficiency standards will start with the phase out of the 100-watt bulbs in January 2012. Traditional 40 and 60 watt incandescent light bulbs will no longer be available as of Jan. 1, 2014. For more information, visit the Department of Energy website.

Induction cooktops
Induction cooktops use a magnetic field to heat up the entire cookware, heating food more evenly and efficiently compared to gas or electric heat sources. (more)

Inflector, window insulator
Window insulators, also called inflectors, are a type of panel window shade designed to reflect or absorb  solar heat from the sun shining through a window. The shades are coated with a solar reflective material on one side and a solar absorbent material on the other which can help save energy. (more)

Infrared thermography
Thermography, also known as thermal imaging or infrared technology, is a valuable tool in performing comprehensive energy audits. The technology is used to detect heat or cooling losses around windows, doors, ceilings, through walls, and more. The testing uses a portable camera to capture images of heating or cooling losses for a home or business. (more)

Inlet damper
An inlet damper on a business, commercial or industrial boiler allows the correct amount of air to enter the boiler or furnace combustion chamber for proper air and fuel mixture to reach optimal efficient use of the fuel. Damper replacement may qualify for the Natural Gas incentive. (more)

Insect retardant insulation
Insulation for attics, walls, crawl spaces, new construction, and various other areas is now available with a bug retardant boric acid treatment. Boric acid, the active ingredient in retardant insulation, is commonly found in household products such as saline eyewash solution, detergents and the food we eat. Although deadly to many insects, boric acid is acceptable for use around pets and people. (more)

Insert - fireplace
An insert is a metal box placed inside an existing fireplace that helps increase efficiency. Fireplace inserts may have glass doors allowing the flames to be viewed while the doors remain closed. Air enters through vents below, moving around the main chamber. The air heats up and exits through vents on the top of the unit. (more)

Insulating concrete forms
Insulating concrete forms are forms for poured concrete walls, which remain as part of the wall once the concrete has cured. These walls provide a stable backing for drywall on the inside for siding or brick on the outside of a home. (more)

Insulation
Properly installing insulation and reducing air leaks into or out of a home are key elements to having a comfortable, energy efficient home. Insulation may qualify for the natural gas incentive. (more)

Insulation baffle, attic
Rafter vents, also called insulation baffles, are used in attics when insulating. The baffles or vents fit inside the attic out next to the eaves or overhang so the soffit vents can allow air to enter the attic. The baffles keep insulation from falling onto the soffit vents, allowing outside cooler air to flow through the soffit vents creating an air flow to move hot air out of the attic through roof vents. (more)

Insulation - basement
A properly insulated basement can save you money on heating and provide a dry, comfortable living space. In most cases, a basement with insulation installed on its exterior walls should be considered a conditioned space. Even in a house with an unconditioned basement, the basement is more connected to other living spaces than to the outside. (more)

Insulation, blown-in
Blown insulation, also called loose fill insulation, is commonly used to insulate existing structures that previously had no insulation, or needed additional insulation. The insulation is made up of loose particles which are blown into attic or wall cavities, which are the spaces between the interior and exterior walls of a building. Since even distribution of the material is important, and because special pneumatic equipment is required, installation is usually done by a professional. (more)

Insulation, bug retardant
Insulation for attics, walls, crawl spaces, new construction, and various other areas is now available with a bug retardant boric acid treatment. Boric acid, the active ingredient in retardant insulation, is commonly found in household products such as saline eyewash solution, detergents and the food we eat. Although deadly to many insects, boric acid is acceptable for use around pets and people. (more)

Insulation, glass-free
Insulation is added to buildings for comfort and saving energy. Glass-free polyester insulation is made from recycled plastic bottles and other post-consumer materials. (more)

Insulation - spray polyurethane foam
Spray polyurethane foam (SPF), also known as open cell and closed cell foam, is better than any other type of insulation at reducing air leakage. Foamed-in-place insulation is relatively easy to use but it may be a more expensive way to completely fill walls and ceiling cavities. SPF insulation is ideal for smaller areas, however it can be used to completely insulate a home or building and is better than any other type of insulation to reduce air infiltration. Make sure you understand the pros and cons of using SPF before making your insulation choice. (more)

Insulation - vermiculite
Vermiculite is a naturally-occurring mineral composed of shiny flakes, resembling the mineral mica. When heated to a high temperature, flakes of vermiculite expand and are a lightweight, fire-resistant and odorless material. Vermiculite has been used in numerous products, including insulation for attics and walls. Sizes of vermiculite products range from very fine particles to large (coarse) pieces nearly an inch long. (more)

Insulation, wall type
Wall insulation is used to reduce heat loss through a wall cavity by filling the air space with a porous material. These materials help to immobilize air and reduce drafts within the wall cavity, substantially reducing energy costs and potentially improving indoor air quality. (more)

Insulator, window inflector
Window insulators, also called inflectors, are a type of panel window shade designed to reflect or absorb  solar heat from the sun shining through a window. The shades are coated with a solar reflective material on one side and a solar absorbent material on the other which can help save energy. (more)

Inverter
An electrical device or converter that changes DC or direct current into AC or alternating current. (more).

iPhone learning thermostat
Easily maintain the desired comfort level in your home with a learning thermostat that remembers your temperature adjustments and programs itself to build a personalized schedule. (more)
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